Great Venues in and around the city

By Laurie

New Post on M&J Bridal Salon Blog…Love the Palm house at The Brooklyn Botanic Gardens perfect for a spring or fall wedding. Read the post to see more venues…

Bridal Wedding Veil

10

By Kristin

veil_full

The tradition of the veil on a bride has many back-stories.  Some say it started in ancient Rome to confuse the evil spirits who may try to steal her away from the groom.  Some say it was to disguise the bride before the wedding of an arranged marriage, this way if he saw something he didn’t like he wouldn’t run away.  It is also said that the lifting of the blusher veil is so the groom knows he is marrying the right woman.  There are so many variations on the story, but today the veil is more an accessory to the gown.

 My best friend recently got engaged and has put me in charge of making her wedding gown and veil.  As her Maid-of-Honor it is my duty to see what would look best on her and work with her taste.  I know she likes lace, being a pretty traditional girl, so that’s what I went with.  Looking in various bridal stores I noticed how expensive beautiful lace edged veils can be!  They can be anywhere as much as $300 on up!  So I’m going to describe how I made a beautiful antique looking lace veil that my friend could use on her big day without the big price tag.

 veil_detail

Materials Used:

Note: I chose a length a little longer than the fingertip.  It is double layered with the top layer being about 8″ shorter than the under-layer.  Choose a length that works for you, I’m going to give directions for fingertip length though. 

 

Directions:

  1. Measure the length from where you want the veil to start, to your knee.
  2. Fold the tulle in half and use the folded edge as the top of the veil (where the comb will be sewn).  Fold this piece in half length wise.  From the top of the folded edge (comb edge) measure the length you used for the head to knee.
  3. Mark with pins a quarter oval.  Make it a little wider at the top than the bottom to give it a more full look.  When you are happy with the shape, cut it out.
  4. Unfold the piece (leave the top and bottom layers folded together) so you now have a half oval shape.  Take the top layer and mark with pins about 8″-10″ up from the edge.  Cut it shorter but still keep the shape of the bottom layer.
  5. Now the fun begins, you get to glue on the lace!  This will take patience and time, it cannot be rushed!  You can also opt to sew the lace on with a machine.  Line the edge of the scallop up with the edge of the tulle and pin in place if sewing, pin it as you glue otherwise.
  6. Once you have the lace attached (and it has dried overnight) you can set the pearls or rhinestones (or both if you so choose).
  7. If you used a scalloped edge lace as I have, be sure to cut the excess tulle from the scallops for a cleaner look.

 The nice thing about the veil is that you can choose to use lace as I did here, leave the tulle plain (like I did for my own wedding), use rattail cord (1mm or 2mm), beaded trims, or a thin ribbon edge.  You can personalize your veil to match your dress and it won’t cost a fortune.