A Lesson in Lace

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At M&J we have a serious love of lace. You might call it an obsession really. We have walls of the stuff at our store! Of course not all lace is the same, and we’re not talking about just patterns either. There are many unique styles of lace from all over the world! Some are made by hand, others are strictly manufactured by machine.  Some are created with using the needle method, others use bobbins. Each method and material used creates a different, but equally beautiful, style. Here are a few of our favorites styles, and a little history behind each!

Alencon Lace

Alençon – One of the most popular types of lace for wedding dresses, Alençon is a French-style lace. It is also one of the most difficult, and thus most expensive, types of lace to make. This style is characterized by floral or leaf motifs on a mesh background. Fun fact: The process of creating this lace by hand has been preserved over the years by Carmelite nuns in Alençon.

Battenburg Lace

Battenburg – Popular in the 1930s and 1940s, Battenburg is a needle lace. You can find it mostly on tablecloths and linens. It is an easy-to-make lace, and much less labor intensive than other embroidered varieties.

Cluny Lace

Cluny – A bobbin-style lace, cluny often features small flowers and loops. This lace is sturdy, and more durable than most. Its name is derived from the Abbey of Cluny in Cluny, France, where it was used by monks.

Schiffli Lace

Schiffli – This is the lace of the new age. Strictly made using modern machines, Schiffli is created by embroidering both the front and the back of a piece of light fabric, usually tulle.

Venise Lace

Venise – This needle lace was once more coveted than jewels. Originating in Venice, Italy, using this lace as an adornment proved you were very wealthy indeed. Thankfully it is now more affordable, and easy to obtain! Its design features no netting, with motifs held together by braids or threads. This makes it perfect for using as a dramatic trim!

These are just SOME of the many styles of lace available at our store. Which look or style do YOU prefer?

18 comments on “A Lesson in Lace

  1. I’m also big on lace, my favorite being Venise with Cluny a close second. I always find the Battenburg at estate sales, which is nice but it would be nice to get a good stash of Venise or Cluny. Your stash is sweet!

  2. sweetsaige says:

    cool! I love lace too!

  3. soumyaj says:

    Reblogged this on quirrk and commented:
    A girl has got to love her lace! :)

  4. nice dress :) i love lace too!!

  5. beautiful! thanks for the info on lace! :)

  6. Nicole Young says:

    Awesome- thanks! I live in Savannah now, but ever since I had a little boutique in Chelsea called Bumbleberry’s, I have loved your lace. I did lace appliqued denim jackets and hi-top sneakers (made custom pairs for a Joan Vass Couture show and for Michael Jackson’s short lived clothing line) BEFORE Madonna!

  7. […] If you’re obsessed with lace like we are, take a look at our Lesson in Lace! […]

  8. Cheryl Wilson says:

    That was great, really informative!!!!!

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